Badges Overview
Learning Relationship Manager

Badges on Fidelis are Mozilla Open Badges Compliant

Demonstrate your skills in a simple, branded way

It just doesn't cut it that after 16 years of school and over 32k hours studying, graduates have only four pieces of data to describe their capabilities a) degree b) school c) year of graduation and d) GPA.

And resume's are even worse because although they allow people to make claims, they provide almost no mechanism to validate or see evidence of claims.

Digital Badges are micro-credentials that solve problems for students, schools, and employers by providing organizations with a way to vouch for people that they've mastered some combination of capabilities. Students benefit because they can use badges to customize their educational pathways. Employers benefit because badges make it easier to find appropriately trained and educated people. And schools benefit because they get self-motivated students who are less likely to drop out.

Fidelis's platform improves badges in 7 critical ways

  • Talent Search

    Search

    If a user learns something important, but can't be discovered through search as a result, it's a wasted opportunity

  • Fidelis on Mobile

    Brand

    Degrees are not all created equal and neither are badges. On Fidelis, the badge is the logo of the conferrer of the badge

  • Fidelis Badges

    Leveled

    The idea that one is either certified or not is silly. Everyone's expertise lies along a spectrum and so to be trusted, all badges have to have levels that represent that spectrum.

  • Fidelis Badges

    Selective

    If it's easy to get, it's not very valuable. On Fidelis badges have clear criteria that has to be met. And our badges go all the way from "Basically Familiar" to "Leading Expert".

  • Fidelis Badges

    Transparent

    In 7 seconds on Fidelis, you can figure out if you think a badge is trustworthy, by noting the brand of the conferrer, quickly looking at the topics covered, and looking at the pass rate (selectivity). Additionally, you can see sample questions at the various levels.

  • Fidelis Badges

    Convenient

    Fidelis's tools make it a snap to build badge exams, to administer them, and to upload third party badges along with evidence that the user has earned that badge.

  • Fidelis Badges

    Employer focus

    Badges are all tagged with common keywords found in job requisitions and resumes, making it easy both for employers to identify the badges they're looking for, and for job seekers to find badges that will make them more competitive for the kinds of jobs they want.

Fidelis Badge Levels*

Level 
1. FamiliarA typical person can become basically familiar with a topic within a day or two of intense study. Exams at this level rely exclusively on objective style questions with correct and incorrect answers.
2. Deeply FamiliarSomeone can become deeply familiar with a topic after about week of intense study. Level 2 exams only have objective style questions.
3. Basically QualifiedMost people can become basically qualified in about a month of intense study. These exams primarily use objective questions, but can also use subjective questions.
4. QualifiedTo learn enough to be level 4 qualified typically requires significant dedication. Three months of intense study, 7 hours a day, 5 days a week would likely be enough if the student were starting from zero. These exams tend to use objective questions as a baseline, but will draw more heavily on knowledge application in open-ended problems.
5. Highly QualifiedWe tend to think of level 5 as a university minor or concentration. To become highly qualified likely requires about a year of intense study or multiple years of engagement. A thousand hours of effort are likely required to build sufficient depth of knowledge to test at this level. A level 5 test will likely require the majority of a day to complete.
6. ProficientProficiency likely requires sustained effort over multiple years. It can be considered at a similar level to an undergraduate degree in the field. A person starting from zero knowledge might take about 2000 hours of effort to become proficient. This test will usually require an full day or two of testing and will mostly rely upon a combination of subjective and live questions.
7. ExpertExpertise is the apex of what can reasonably be assessed in a test. It might take a person 5000 hours of effort to become an expert and many 8 hour days of testing to prove their expertise. You can imagine a test of expertise to be similar in format and nature to board exams administered to doctors at the end of a residency.

*We can customize your badges into different levels. Fidelis uses the following as a default.

Badges on Fidelis are real credentials exclusively for real achievements

There is no place for badges for participation, conferred like so many trophies to make people feel good or raise self-esteem. After all, self-esteem laid atop a superficial sheen, is a sorry substitute for confidence built on real achievement.

Example Badges

Think of badges like a quantified letter of recommendation where the badge conferrer is vouching
for the person's capability in some specific domain of expertise

  • Knowledge
  • Skills
  • Personality
  • Aptitude
  • Character & Soft Skills
  • All

Knowledge

These micro­credentials provide evidence that the person has mastered some set of information or knowledge. Knowledge badges are characterized by traditional short form testing. A common criticism of knowledge badges is that being knowledgeable about a subject doesn't, on its own, qualify the badge holder for much of anything. We accept that, and include them here because much of formal education is spent mastering important knowledge that acts as a building block to broader capabilities and because a lack of knowledge can prevent a person from being successful in most arenas.

  • Badge Name
  • Brand
  • Brand
  • Brand
  • Biology
  • Harvard
  • MIT
  • Stanford
  • Merger Management
  • Northwestern University - Kellogg
  • University of Virginia Darden School of Business
  • Dartmouth College - Tuck
  • Innovation Theory & Practice
  • Salesforce
  • Alexion Pharmaceuticals
  • VMware
  • Business Strategy
  • Harvard
  • INSEAD
  • The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania
  • Intelligence
  • McKinsey & Company
  • The Boston Consulting Group, Inc.
  • Bain & Company
  • Finance
  • The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania
  • University of Chicago Booth School of Business
  • New York University Stern School of Business
  • Chemistry
  • Florida State University
  • Rockefeller University
  • University of Rochester
  • Computer Science
  • University of Florida
  • Indiana University Bloomington
  • Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
  • Criminal Justice Theory & Practice
  • Drury University
  • The City University of New York
  • University of Louisville
  • Economics - Development
  • Yale
  • University of California - ​Berkeley
  • Brown
  • Economics - Econometrics
  • UCLA
  • Harvard
  • Northwestern
  • Economics - Industrial Organizations
  • Austin Chamber of Commerce
  • Baton Rouge Area Chamber
  • Economic Futures Group
  • Economics - International
  • MIT
  • University of Michigan - Ann Arbor
  • University of Wisconsin - Madison
  • Economics - Labor
  • University of California - Berkeley
  • University of Chicago
  • University of Michigan - Ann Arbor
  • Economics - Public Finance
  • Syracuse University - Maxwell
  • University of Kentucky - Martin
  • Indiana University - Bloomington
  • Education Theory & Practice
  • Johns Hopkins University
  • Vanderbilt University
  • University of Wisconsin - Madison
  • Accounting Theory & Practice
  • Deloitte
  • PricewaterhouseCoopers
  • Ernst and Young
  • US Executive Branch History, Rules and Function
  • President of United States Seal
  • Georgetown University
  • George Washington University
  • The US Constitution & Federal Law
  • Harvard Law School
  • Supreme Court of the United States
  • United States Department of Justice
  • History - Military
  • Harvard
  • Chapman University
  • Ashland University
  • History & Culture - Latin American
  • Yale
  • University of Wisconsin - Madison
  • Duke
  • Logistics Industry Products, History, Norms, Practices
  • US Navy
  • FedEX
  • Wal-Mart
  • Hotel Administration (Hospitality)
  • Cornell
  • Hilton Hotels & Resorts
  • Johnson & Wales University

Skills

These badges are radically different than knowledge badges in that you can directly test knowledge with test, whereas skills have to be observed to be verified. Skills are about doing something, the gerund being operative. Frequently skills , demand that the person apply knowledge to problems.

  • Skill Name
  • Brand
  • Brand
  • Brand
  • English
  • IELTS, iTEP
  • Test of Spoken English
  • Merriam Webster
  • Writing
  • Pullitzer Foundation
  • Designing for the web
  • Webby
  • Prepared Public Speaking
  • Toastmasters
  • Financial Modeling
  • Training the Street
  • Goldman Sachs
  • Merril Lynch
  • Analyzing Data
  • Edward Tufte
  • Nate Silver
  • Extemporaneous Public Speaking
  • Toastmasters
  • Singing
  • American Idol
  • Playing Guitar
  • Marty Schwartz
  • Berklee College
  • Illustrating
  • Behance
  • Managing budgets
  • Japanese
  • Japanese Language Proficiency Test
  • Presenting with Impact
  • Bain
  • McKinsey
  • Spanish Speaking
  • Chinese Speaking
  • French Speaking
  • German Speaking
  • Russian Speaking
  • Korean Speaking
  • Using and Setting Up Salesforce.com

Personality

In many professions, personality is critical to success . And personality is critical to interpersonal relationship success between mentors and mentees. Although it's an imperfect science, we make it possible for users to earn micro­credentials for their personality so that they can be more effectively found by employers and so that our algorithms can more effectively recommend mentors and other social connections.

  • Personality Test
  • Brand
  • Meyers Briggs (Jung Typology)
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  • Enneogram
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  • Big 5 Personality Test
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  • Color Personality Test
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  • DISC Personality Test
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  • Activity vector analysis (AVA)
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  • California Psychological Inventory
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  • Herrmann Brain Dominance Instrument (HBDI)
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  • Holland Codes (RIASEC)
  • Keirsey Temperament Sorter
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  • Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI)
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  • Revised NEO Personality Inventory
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  • Taylor-Johnson Temperament Analysis
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  • Gallup Strengths Finder
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  • Gallup Entrepreneur Survey
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  • Temperament and Character Inventory
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  • Thematic Apperception Test
  • -

Aptitude

These are probably the most controversial kinds of badges. There's a school of thought that suggests that the way to succeed is to figure out what you're naturally good at and to focus on those things. On the other hand, Some people either don't believe in natural aptitude, but in the absolute neural plasticity of people, or they don't believe that we have the ability to measure aptitude because all the tests have bias. We recognize the merits of these arguments, but include these badges because some of our customers have asked for them.

  • Aptitude Test
  • Brand
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  • SAT
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  • IQ
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  • ACT
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  • GMAT
  • -
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  • LSAT
  • -
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  • MCAT
  • -
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  • EQ
  • -
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  • GRE
  • -
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  • Cattell Culture Fair
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  • Kohs block
  • -
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  • Leiter International Performance Scale
  • -
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  • Miller Analogies Test
  • -
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  • Otis-Lennon School Ability Test
  • -
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  • Raven's Progressive Matrices
  • -
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  • Stanford-Binet IQ Test
  • -
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  • Sternberg Triarchic Abilities Test
  • -
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  • Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale
  • -
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  • Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children
  • -
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  • Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence
  • -
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  • Wonderlic Test
  • -
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  • Modern Language Aptitude Test
  • -
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  • Pimsleur Language Aptitude Battery
  • -
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  • Porteus Maze Test
  • -
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Character & Soft Skills

No matter how much we learn, there are certain intangible qualities that make some people succeed in some domains and other people succeed in others. For many of these qualities, it's either too difficult, or fundamentally impossible, to come up with an objective measure.

Fidelis is trying to solve this problem by creating this social framework for measuring these attributes. Every single learning community on the platform can publish micro­credentials that compare the badge holder not to some objective standard, but to the median person in that community.

  • M.E.C.E List of Attributes / Reputation
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  • Creative
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  • Organized
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  • Curious
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  • Analytical
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  • Resilient
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  • Decisive
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  • Detail oriented
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  • Unselfishness
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  • Ambitious
  • Outgoing
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  • Trustworthy
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  • Hardworking - grit
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  • Patient
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  • Tactful - Diplomatic
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  • Disciplined
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  • Enthusiastic
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  • Dependable
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  • Composed in crisis
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  • Empathetic
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  • Motivating
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Getting started is easy

We can launch a pilot with any segment of your organization without doing any integration work. Once we've established the case for full implementation, Fidelis's APIs make it simple to integrate our platform with your systems to take full advantage of the end-to-end experience.

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